Quick! Run For The Light!


Crib Goch Snowdon Pan
Looking to Cwm Uchaf and the mighty Crib Goch. Carnedd Ugain and Yr Wyddfa (Snowdon) under the whif of cloud.

Hi guys.

As the name of my blog suggests, when you are a landscape photographer, you often have to be in the right place, at the right time to get those amazing shots with all the light-play and drama that make so many photographs so beautiful to look at. Last night however, as I said in my previous post, I missed out on the best light by I would say about 20 minutes. But after parking the car up at the end of the road in Dinorwig, I literally sprinted (ok, maybe I ran a little faster than a jog; I’m not the sprightly runner I used to be) to get to where I wanted to be, and there was just enough light and shadow for me to play with, dancing around on the slopes and crags of the Snowdon Massif.

I really wanted to try and take some more panoramic shots, a couple of which I’ve posted, above and below. I’ve discovered from my previous post’s picture that it is often best to take a multitude of shots and not necessarily in landscape; portrait is often the way to go here – not only to get the depth, but also so that when you work with the images in Photoshop to merge them you avoid cropping too much off the final, merged image. Which is why the top of Carnedd y Filiast has been decapitated in my previous shot!

What is known as the ‘Rule of Thirds’ in the photography world can come in handy here; on a lot of cameras, you have the option to turn on the grid-lines on the LED screen which divide up what you see into nine equal boxes or 3 x 3 square, hence the thirds rule. This is so that you can align certain parts of your shot within different parts of the frame, to create more interest. However, like all good rules, this one can be broken too, just be careful how you break it. But seriously, next time you’re out shooting, turn on those grid-lines and you’ll get an idea of how much easier it is to compose your shot, if you don’t necessarily have a natural eye for it. For example, you might want to take a shot of the sea, with foreground detail – so line up the sea’s horizon across the top horizontal line to start with, and if there’s anything in the frame to add interest, say a light house, frame it to the left or right of the image and your shot will look so much more interesting. Take a look at an image of mine to give you an idea; clickety-click. I broke the ‘rules’ a little with this shot, as the horizon of the sea is higher than the top horizontal line; I wanted more of the knapweed in the image and as the sky wasn’t very interesting, I didn’t frame it.

Anyway, here are my favourite pictures taken from last night, I hope you enjoy them. If you like my images, and my blog, please share them from my Flickr feed.

Llyn-Peris-Pan
Looking over Llyn Peris and a small part of the Hydro Electric plant. Beyond is the Pass of Llanberis.
Yet another distraction en route to my destination; looking north west over the village of Deiniolen to western Anglesey.
Yet another distraction en route to my destination; looking north west over the village of Deiniolen to western Anglesey.
Phew! Just enough light left.
Phew! Just enough light left.
As it cools and cloud rolls in from the sea, Moel Eilio is the first to be engulfed.
As it cools and cloud rolls in from the sea, Moel Eilio is the first to be engulfed.
Sunset north west over Llyn Padarn
Sunset north west over Llyn Padarn
Looking west from the viewpoint to the Moel Eilio range and Cwm Dwythwch; one of my favourite hill days.
West to Foel Goch and the obvious cleft of Bwlch Maesgwm.
West to Foel Goch and the obvious cleft of Bwlch Maesgwm.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s